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Third single from Erasure's 1988 album The Innocents. Released on September 19th, 1988, it peaked on the UK music singles charts at #4. Still played at 80s retro parties everywhere. The band Wheatus also turned in a decent cover of the song in 2001.

Written by: Clarke/Bell
Published by: Musical Moments Ltd/Minotaur Music Ltd/Sony/ATV Music Publishing (UK) Ltd

Produced by: Stephen Hague
Engineered by: Bob Kraushaar
Recorded at: Blackwing and Swanyard Studios

CD-Single (CD Mute 85)

  1. A Little Respect
  2. A Little Respect Extended Mix
  3. Like Zsa Zsa Zsa Gabor (Rico Conning Mix)
  4. Love Is Colder Than Death

12" (12 Mute 85)

  1. A Little Respect (Extended Mix)
  2. Like Zsa Zsa Zsa Gabor (Mark Freegard Mix)
  3. Love Is Colder Than Death

Limited 12" (L12 Mute 85)

  1. A Little Respect (Big Train Mix)
  2. Like Zsa Zsa Zsa Gabor (Rico Conning Mix)
  3. Love Is Colder Than Death

7" (Mute 85)

  1. A Little Respect
  2. Like Zsa Zsa Zsa Gabor

Limited 7" (Mute 85)

  1. A Little Respect
  2. Like Zsa Zsa Zsa Gabor

A little story about this song...

During my latter teenage years, I was involved on a regular basis with an Asian church youth group. For about a year or so, it was a great refuge for intellectual discussions that didn't revolve around getting plastered, smoking weed, and other typical teenage topics of the day. Rather, the discussions would revolve around more thought-provoking topics such as the fall of the Berlin Wall, the relevance of the church institution, the concept of a soul - all tied in, of course, to the teachings of Christ.

Plus, it was a great group to hang out with as we would participate in a variety of outdoor activities such as rock climbing, hiking, camping, swimming, canoeing, etc.

One summer, as we sat around a campfire, another discussion started - this time around homosexuality and the impact of it on the institution of marriage. Not surprisingly, what started out as a calm and thoughtful discussion soon degenerated into a split party - half against even considering the idea of gay marriage, the other half being a little more open to exploring it further instead of shutting it down outright.

One person of the former camp simply came out right and said, "Homosexuals are a deviancy to the human race and should forsake this whole idea of marriage, lest they tear apart the fabric that keeps families united under God!"

A hush settled over the camp as we realized that we were getting involved in a debate that already was threatening to tear apart the congregation of several churches, including ours. I whipped out my guitar, strummed a few chords and began to sing this song...


I try to discover a little something to make me sweeter
Oh baby refrain from breaking my heart

I'm so in love with you
I'll be forever blue
That you gimme no reason why you make me work so hard

That you gimme no
That you gimme no
That you gimme no
That you gimme no

Soul, I hear you calling
Oh baby please
Give a little respect to me

And if I should falter would you open your arms to me?
We can make love not war and live at peace with our hearts

I'm so in love with you
I'll be forever blue
What religion or reason could drive a man to forsake his lover?

Don't you tell me no
Don't you tell me no
Don't you tell me no
Don't you tell me no

Soul, I hear you calling
Oh baby please
Give a little respect to me

I'm so in love with you
I'll be forever blue
That you gimme no reason, you know you make me work so hard

That you gimme no
That you gimme no
That you gimme no
That you gimme no

Soul, I hear you calling
Oh baby please (give a little respect)
Give a little respect to me

Soul, I hear you calling
Oh baby please (give a little respect)
Give a little respect to me

Most of the group (and on both sides) instantly recognized the song (being kids of the 80s) and sang along - some perhaps not paying attention to the lyrics or not aware of the fact that the songwriters were gay. However, most understood the interpretation. When it was done, we agreed that we would let the discussion be.

About a year later, the church we attended split into two factions over the concept of ordaining homosexual priests and church leaders. As a result, the youth group split into two as children had little choice but to follow their elders to the respective factions.

Nevertheless, while I don't attend church anymore and have moved out of my youthful years for some time, A Little Respect reminds me of that one interesting night in the middle of a campsite - for one quite moment, a song stopped the commotion and brought everyone together, if only for a short period of time.


an empty nodeshell no more...
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