display | more...

The
BARTENDER'S FRIEND


A COMPILATION OF THE BEST IN MIXI-
COLOGY FROM RELIABLE SOURCES, BOTH
NEW AND OLD, AND PARTICULARLY FROM
THE FORMULARY OF THE FAMOUS OLD
GRAND OPERA HOUSE BAR, SYRACUSE,
NEW YORK.

by
A MIXER

with the collaboration of
Patrick W. Guinee
formerly of the Old Iroquois Bar, Plainfield, N.J.,
and one of the best
MIXERS in the days when
Drinks were Drinks.


Introduction

It is the purpose of this book to present in logical order and in concise form the outstanding principles in the art of tending bar. It is hoped that it will be an aid not only to bartenders, but to their employers, the proprietors, and to that vast army of amateur mixers who during the recent Dry Ages have been "rolling their own."

In the arrangement of the formulas for the mixing of the various drinks, the idea has been to present them in strict alphabetical order according to the beginning letter of the name by which the drink is ordinarily and properly known, and not to group them according to whether they are cocktails, fizzes, juleps, or other kinds of drinks are covered in these pages, such a grouping may be found in the index, with the representative paging of each drink in the particular group or class.

It has been the intention to furnish in this book the names and formulas of all the drinks which a first-class bartender should know, both old and new, and to omit those names which are little known and seldom called (generally renamed old mixtures already set out herein under more honorable and lasting titles). On account of their age and historical interest we have listed a few drinks which come under neither of the above classes: e.g., Wassail Bowl, Rumfustian, Sack Posset, etc.


The Bartender's Friend is a slender tome measuring 5.5 by 8 inches, bound in thin black leather over heavy board, originally printed in 1933, and, alas, long out of print. This is a document that attempts to codify knowledge that might have been lost during Prohibition. It represents a curious time in American bartending, not the Golden Age and not quite the happy go lucky mid Century.

The book has over a hundred pages of drink formulas, and several sections of instructions pertainant to the profession of bartending. The recipes in this book show their era more strongly than the text. There are very few vodka-based drinks, and many drinks on a whiskey base. Many recipes for punch are included as well.

Perhaps there is historical or literary interest in drinks of this era. Requests for specific drinks to be served up for EDB to well and truly imbibe will be entertained, /msg me.

Log in or register to write something here or to contact authors.