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The so-called sects of Judaism did not consist, as in other communities, of dissidents from the main body on grounds of doctrine or discipline, but were composed of outward conformists, who strove, by one method or another, to give intenser expression to its principles and life. The word "Order," as applied to the Jesuits in the Roman Church, would nearly, though not altogether, describe their position. Some communities also, which, although not of the Ten Tribes, held various relations of affinity with the chosen people, are sometimes known as "Sects." As the word is convenient it may be retained, provided that the wide variety of its applications is borne in mind.

The following scheme exhibits at one view the main divisions which existed in Scripture times:

   I. - THE KENITES.
  II. - THE RECHABITES.
 III. - THE SAMARITANS.
  IV. - NAZIRITES.
        THE CHASIDIM.
   V. - THE PHARISEES.
  VI. - THE SADDUCEES.
 VII. - THE ESSENES.
VIII. - THE SCRIBES.
  IX. - THE LAWYERS.
   X. - THE HERODIANS.
  XI. - THE ZEALOTS.
 XII. - THE GALILEANS.
XIII. - SICARII.

OTHER CLASSES OF JEWS.
 XVI. - THE SANHEDRIN.
  XV. - PROSELYTES.
 XVI. - PUBLICANS.
XVII. - HELLENISTS.

see also: The Origin of the Jewish Sects

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