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(1928) Walter Donaldson(composer), Gus Kahn(lyricist)

Love me or leave me and let me be lonely
You won't believe me but I love you only
I'd rather be lonely than happy with somebody else

You might find the night time the right time for kissing
Night time is my time for just reminiscing
Regretting instead of forgetting with somebody else

There'll be no one unless that someone is you
I intend to be independently blue

I want your love, don't wanna borrow
Have it today to give back tomorrow
Your love is my love
There's no love for nobody else

Say, love me or leave me and let me be lonely
You won't believe me but I love you only
I'd rather be lonely than happy with somebody else

You might find the night time the right time for kissing
Night time is my time for just reminiscing
Regretting instead of forgetting with somebody else

There'll be no one unless that someone is you
I intend to be independently blue

Say, I want your love, don't wanna borrow
Have it today to give back tomorrow
Your love is my love
My love is your love
There's no love for nobody else

Written by the songwriting team William Donaldson(composer) and Gus Kahn(lyricist) for the 1928 Broadway show, Whoopee, starring Eddie Cantor and Ruth Etting. It was one of three big hits to come out of that show along with My Baby Just Cares for Me and Makin' Whoopee.

The Nina Simone cover of this song features some fantastic piano work as she gets all Bach in a bridge between the repetition of the lyrics. Alternatively, the Count Basie instrumental cover of this song (Count Basie: Basie and Friends, Pablo Records, Track 3) has drummer Louis Bellson matching Ms. Simone flourish for flourish -- quite an accomplishment considering he only has a drum set to duel with her piano. Basie's famously terse, spacious style compared to Nina's verbose, complex piano work highlights the versatility of jazz; two totally different interpretations of the same song both make great music.

The Lindy Hop competition team, Minnie's Moochers, used a Nina Simone version of this song to great effect to win the Team Division of the 2000 North Atlantic Dance Championships. By taking first place without the use of any flashy aerials, the Moochers proved that you could win with pure musicality. Their victory legitimized and popularized a groovier, musicality-centric sub-style of Lindy Hop, Modern Savoy.

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