display | more...

TAFE is a strange place. I began my transformation into a chef there, and now I am completing the course (not the transformation) by providing high quality food every week in their 'training restaurant'. It is a strange place, because during the Hot and Cold Dessert module we attempted a chocolate mousse based on the TAFE's recipe.

It was embarrassing.

We added the melted chocolate (with no butter or liquid) to the cold cream, and funnily enough while trying to mix the two, the chocolate solidified, and our 'mousse' was like chocolate stuck to the bowl with cream. The eggs never made it in.

The restaurant is also a place of ups and downs. Last class, I had my first meal returned. Oh the pain! This time, I got my first proposition. Ack!

It was embarrassing.

At the end of service, and after we have cleaned the kitchen, we go out to meet the customers. I know a lot of people get into cooking for the sex - but honestly, I'm in it for the food. So I was really glad that he enjoyed the mousse, but.. er... well... blushing for the rest.

Anyway, I had been searching for a great recipe, and there are a couple already on here. But this one, well it could take you anywhere. This recipe was provided by a fellow student, and believe me, it is rich.

Ingredients
(4 portions)

Method

It can't be stressed enough: the aim of the chocolate mousse game is aeration.

Put the chocolate, butter and orange juice in a heatproof bowl over a pan of simmering water.

Gently stir until butter and chocolate have melted. Then add the cocoa powder (this helps the richness of the mousse, if you want to go easy on how rich it is, leave out some of the cocoa powder, to taste).

Remove the bowl from the heat and whisk in egg yolks and Cointreau. Leave the bowl on the bench to cool, but do not put it in the fridge.

Beat the cream until it forms soft peaks. Cover and refrigerate until needed. It can't be stressed enough: the aim of the chocolate mousse game is aeration (beating adds air to the mixture).

Beat the egg whites to form soft peaks. Then add the sugar, forming a meringue. Beat this until it is smooth and glossy. It can't be stressed enough: the aim of the chocolate mousse game is aeration (beating adds air to the mixture).

Very gently fold in the egg whites. This is the stage where you are likely to lose the air beaten into the egg whites. Don't bang the side of the bowl; do take you time to fold in the whites. It can't be stressed enough: the aim of the chocolate mousse game is aeration (folding too quickly or roughly, banging the bowl will all lead to loss of air).

Before the egg whites are completely incorporated, add the cream. Continue to fold carefully and gently. It can't be stressed enough: the aim of the chocolate mousse game is aeration (folding too quickly or roughly will lead to loss of air).

When all the cream and egg whites are incorporated - specifically when the mousse has taken on a uniform light brown colour - pour into your serving vessels and refrigerate for at least one hour. Remember that you have used raw eggs - and the product should not be in the fridge for more than 24 hours or so. It can't be stressed enough: the aim of the chocolate mousse game is aeration (the fresher the eggs increases the amount of air that can be incorporated).

Serving Suggestion: Pipe a dollop of cream on top of the set mousse. Place two orange segments overlapping the cream. Drape with some orange zest.

Log in or register to write something here or to contact authors.