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Most Roman Weapons of the day were made of bronze or copper. Their War Technology was incredibly advanced, as was their military tactics.

  • aclys - a kind of javelin
  • aculeus - a pointed implement, spike
  • ammentum - a thong or loop attached to a spear; a throwing-strap
  • ancile - a small figure-of-eight or waisted shield
  • arcus - a bow
  • aries - a battering ram, an engine for breaking down walls
  • arma - weapons; armor
  • ballista - a military engine for discharging stones and other missiles
  • caetra - a small, light shield
  • calamatus - an arrow
  • cassis - a helmet
  • catapulta - a machine for discharging bolts or other missiles
  • cateia - a curved missile weapon, perhaps a boomerang
  • cestrophendone - a catapult for discharging bolts
  • cipeolum - a small shield
  • clipeus - a round, usually bronze, shield
  • contus - a long spear, lance, or pike
  • copis - a short, curved sword
  • corax - a kind of siege-engine
  • cornus - a spear or javelin of cornel wood
  • corvus - a military engine, a kind of grapnel
  • cudo - helmet
  • culter - a knife
  • curis - a spear
  • cuspis - a spear, lance
  • dolo - a weapon apparently having a wooden shaft and short iron point
  • ensiculus - a small sword
  • ensis - sword
  • fala - a wooden siege-tower
  • falarica - a heavy missile weapon, discharged by machine or by hand
  • falx - a military implement shaped like a sickle, used to pull down walls or men on walls
  • ferrum - sword
  • fraxinus - a spear or javelin of ash
  • funda - a leather strap for hurling stones, a sling
  • gaesum - a gallic javelin
  • gladiolus - a small sword
  • gladius - a sword
  • gorytos - quiver for holding arrows
  • grus - a kind of siege-engine
  • hasta - a spear, javelin
  • hastula - a small spear
  • helepolis - a siege-engine, a kind of mobile tower
  • iaculum - a throwing-spear, javelin; missile
  • lancea - a long light spear, lance
  • lanciola - a small lance
  • ligula - a kind of short sword
  • loncha - a spear, javelin
  • machina - a siege-engine
  • machinamentum - a siege-engine
  • mataris - a gallic throwing-spear
  • mesancylum - a javelin with a thong for throwing
  • parazonium - a dagger worn at the girdle
  • parma - a small, usually round, shield carried by light infantry and cavalry
  • parmula - a small parma
  • pelta - a light, often crescent-shaped, shield
  • pilum - a trown javelin made with soft iron. Would bend once implanted in enemy shields, rendering the shield useless.
  • pugio - a short weapon for stabbing, a dagger
  • pugiunculus - a small dagger
  • rumex - a kind of javelin or hunting-spear
  • runa - a kind of weapon
  • sagitta - an arrow
  • scutulum - a little sword
  • scutum - a shield; strictly, the oblong, wooden shield used by heavy infantry
  • securix - an ax, battle-axe
  • sica - a dagger
  • soliferreum - a kind of javelin made wholly of iron
  • sparus - a kind of javelin
  • sybina - a kind of spear or javelin
  • telum - a spear
  • tragula - a spear fitted with a throwing-strap
  • venabulum - a hunting-spear
  • verutum - a short throwing-spear with a tapering metal head

    They had tactics for both attack and defense.

  • Projectile Attack - They would halt advance, and form a wall of their sheilds. This was effective until their battles in Germania, where the Gaul's would simply charge and strike, with brute force, and cleave the soldiers through their shields.
  • Charging - Arranged in a phalanx, or rectangle, they would march steadily towards the enemy. This formation was not very effective.
  • Enemy Shielding - Romans had long wooden spears with iron spearheads known as pilum's. They would throw these into enemy shields, causing the spearhead to bend once in the enemy shield. Then the enemy shield would hinder mobility, and be cast away.
  • Intimidation - Battle gear. The Romans wore long cloaks, feathered helmets, and sparkling weapons. This was a fearsome site to see.
  • Fatigue - Roman soldiers at the front of the phalanx would fight for 15 minutes or so. Then, the line behind that one would move up, and replace the tired soldiers.
  • Attrition - Most Roman sieges were won by attrition. If the siege took too long, though, siege-towers were built.
  • Training - All Roman soldiers were jack-of-all-trade men. They could perform any military task.
  • Unity and Loyalty - Morale and loyalty were sky high. Each soldier was brother to the next. If they ran, they were abandoning their family.

    All these things led to the Romans conquering almost all of the known world at that time.

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