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Here I sit, eating some winegums (sort of semi-hard plastic-looking candy, probably known by some other name in other languages, perhaps jellybeans, but here in The Netherlands they are called winegums).
There are a few different colors, and every color has a different flavor. The red, black, green and white ones taste very good, but the yellow and orange ones are just disgusting!
The orange ones should taste like some sort of orange (the fruit, not the color), but they taste more like a strange fabricated sour-like plastic chemical flavor, which is uncomparable to anything else. Trust me, they taste nothing like an orange.
On to the yellow ones. They taste even more disgusting then the orange ones! I can't even begin to describe how they taste. They should taste like lemon, but once again, they taste more like plastic then like a lemon.

I don't think it is a coincidence that from the orange and yellow ones there are more in a bag then of any of the other colors. This way, there are not as much good tasting ones as there should be, so you'll buy another bag sooner, which means more profit for the manufacturers. And this bugs me. Not because I don't want them to have a profit, but when I buy a bag of these things, I don't want to have to throw away 30% or more. I want a bag full of good tasting candy dammit!

While the notion of good and bad sweets is largely arbitrary, some things just taste bad. We have Winegums in the UK (the most popular brand is Maynard). These notionally taste of wine (red = Port, yellow = Champagne etc). They don't really of course, but I think they all taste OK.

...there are not as much good tasting ones as there should be, so you'll buy another bag sooner, which means more profit for the manufacturers.
No (rational) company is going to provide a bad product in order to shift more units. A sane consumer will simply stop buying the product. Selling a product, such as sweets, in which some of the contents are 'nice', and some are 'nasty' s equally risky. Unless the nice ones contain some extremely addictive substance, such as nicotine or crack, then the customer will soon give up.

Apply the same logic to floppy disks. If 3Com (or whoever) made 50% of floppy disks physically defective, you'd have to buy more boxes to compensate for the fact that some of your disks don't work. BUT, this only works IF 3Com were the only supplier. As it is, there are other companies making disks (and winegums) which mean you can simply switch your loyalty to a better product.

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