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Welcome to Word Enchilada S01E06

We write prototypes, fight our inner demons, get cargo ships unstuck at the Suez Canal, arrive late to posting our own quests, insert emoji 🍅 into e2, burn out of the internet, bake bread, eat enchiladas and get in fights

What?

A microquest for Everything2 in the spirit of Game Jams

How?

The updated rules are in Word Enchilada Rules, but here’s the TL;DR

  1. Just before the Quest starts, a theme will be revealed. Please don’t spoil it for yourself, only read it after the official start of the Enchilada1;
  2. You have 48 hours to write a prototype2 that follows3 the theme;
  3. You post the prototype in this node;
  4. ???
  5. Profit! You will receive fabulous prizes4

After the Quest is over, you’re encouraged to give the noder below you some feedback on their prototype. Bear in mind: the goal of Word Enchiladas is to write for fun and outside of one’s comfort zone, so be constructive and be kind.

Theme!

The theme for this Enchilada is:

QHQR JUL ABG GUR BGURE BAR

E2 Rot13 Encoder

The suggested nodetype is:

idea

Start and end times

The Word Enchilada starts at May 14, 2021 12:00 PM and ends at May 16, 2021 12:00 PM in whatever time zone you observe.

Notes for today: Delayed because of personal issues surrounding burnout. The rest of the events will happen as scheduled… or will they? See this daylog for some news.


  1. The idea being that you shouldn’t prepare anything beforehand, and that you should only have 48 hours to work on your writeup. But I’m just a footnote, not a policeman.

  2. The word “Prototype” is important here: you’re expected to write a quick draft, not a perfect, well edited writeup.

  3. The phrase “Following the theme” is purposefully ambiguous. Be creative :)

  4. Actually, some GP, depending on how much the E2 gods can spare… Updated details on the Word Enchilada Rules

I was just uploading a YouTube video. In fact, I was about halfway through an upload. And then, I shifted my laptop a little and this set off a series of events. My laptop's keyboard is old and gunky, so I use a USB keyboard that sits atop the normal keyboard. And every once in a while it presses against the screenshot key. Thus my laptop takes screenshots. Many of them. So many that it floods out all other processes and I have to open a command line and manually kill the processes. In this case, it used up all my memory and the browser crashed in the middle of the upload. And then when I restart...there it is at 51%. Not moving upwards. Is it a zombie upload? Should I kill the past hour and start again? It is 1 AM.

Do you know what they say about Linux? That it makes hard things easy, and easy things impossible. There is probably some intricate reason why someone would want to take 100 screenshots in 500 milliseconds. There are many non-intricate reason why a normal user would not want that to happen. But I have chosen this particular operating system, and I don't get upset when Linux decides to Linux.

But I have to admit, even though I am 41 years old, that when dealing with people, I sometimes think: "Can we please not do this in the most difficult, stupid, joy-destroying way possible?" Given two options, one of which is an easy, fun and productive way to do something, and the other which is difficult, miserable and doomed to failure, maybe once in a while we should look for the first? At the risk of bringing up indelicate subjects, once I had a girlfriend who suggested we needed a conversational safeword to use when we were walking on dangerous emotional territory, an easy way to say that this is not a time to start picking at scabs. Every once in a while, a bolt of insight comes down that maybe this isn't the day to see if we can find it for a little bit cheaper across town, or try to repair a sparking washing machine while holding a flashlight in our teeth or to convince people that they need recommendations on how our favorite self-help author can change their life. Maybe every once in a while we can decide to do things the easy way.

Got into an argument recently. Big surprise, huge wow, I know. Such a likeable person, and with such a content, unruffled personality, it's shocking that anybody would find something to match words with me over, and despite my placid and appeasing attitude, the two of us had it out. But to be honest, I knew it was coming. And when it was over, I was glad that it happened.

Vocal, opinionated, and highly aware of granular nuances (that is to say, a nitpicker), he always had something to say. Of course this was balanced, in his mind, by the idea that you were allowed to do the same in response: he thought he could dish it out, since his thick skin could also take it. From here, it is now obvious that is not true, but maybe he still believes it of himself.

Three minutes of verbal disagreement (with varying levels of politeness) before he blocked me. Quick, like jiu-jitsu. Didn't even start to get mean to him. Dude knew me for two months, and decided that a little analysis and banter about how to play a computer game was over the line. Why not just play better? It's easy, if a bit boring, and would have gotten better results. But no, high effort strategies that fail outside higher skill brackets is the way he wants to play, and suggesting any alternative is an attack on the center of his character. I should have done something more polite, like splash vomit at his feet.

The relief I feel is from the fact that this fight wasn't something I wanted to start, or wanted to avoid, it was just an inevitable fact of our personalities. No false agreeability here, no feckless alter-ego who serves up piping hot compliance in order to receive the burden of this dude's friendship. Not exaggerated or spiteful either, just caught with the contraband of a countervailing opinion by an argumentative type who brooks no disagreement. He expected me to be someone I'm not, and I asked him, in a sense, also to be different than what he was. We both said, "not the other one, and here's why." There's satisfaction, maybe a little joy, in our mutual rejection.

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