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This is the first line of I Am the Walrus, the rest of which is analysed better elsewhere. It is thought by thirstily thinking thinkers to be a bit of a rip-and-tittle from a folk song, "Marching to Pretoria" which boasts the lyric, "I'm with you and you're with me and we are all together."

Now, it is attested, also, that much of Walrus was penned with an eager eye on confounding song-interpreters who had already read too much into Beatles lyrics. But a desire to expound upon meaninglessness means not at all that every line in the song is meaningless, or is desired to be (or desires to be), or even when such is desired to be, not reflective of some higher truth which binds us throughout and creeps into our subconsciousness. And, into our lyrics should we, if we, when we lyricise.

And so, perhaps we may arrive at an insight, an oddity as it seems, that in going forth to pen a gibberish concatenation, a whimsical noncical mindbender, John Lennon incidentally (but mayhap not accidentally) opened his mind to the voice of the dreaming Cosmic squall. Like a theist speaking in tongues (minus the narrow-minded predisposition lugged into that effort), we are elucidated by this line to a proposition: We are, all of us, spirits of the same Creator; We are the same; We are one; I am God ("I am He"?); you are God ("you too are He"?); But all is God; We are God (because) God is one (and so, "we are all together"!!)....

The whole of which popped right into my mind (again, the Universe unwittingly at work?) as I read from a nearly 300 year-old poem, by Alexander Pope, An Essay on Man wherein Pope, too, wrote:

"All are but parts of one stupendous whole / Whose body nature is, and God the soul"

"True words," existence itself cries out, recaptured by a fellow Englishman (and it is not all that far from Liverpool to Pope's London) in more modern parlance a quarter millennium on -- after all, how else could it be that "I am the eggman" even as "They are eggmen" and "I am the Walrus"? Goo goo ga joob!!