display | more...
French Text
O Belgique, ô mère chérie,
A toi nos coeurs, à toi nos bras,
A toi notre sang, ô Patrie!
Nous le jurons tous, tu vivras!
Tu vivras toujours grande et belle
Et ton invincible unité
Aura pour devise immortelle:
Le Roi, la Loi, la Liberté!
Le Roi, la Loi, la Liberté!
Le Roi, la Loi, la Liberté!

Flemish Text

O dierbaar België
O heilig land der vaad'ren
Onze ziel en ons hart zijn u gewijd.
Aanvaard ons hart en het bloed van onze adren,
Wees ons doel in arbeid en in strijd.
Bloei, o land, in eendracht niet te breken;
Wees immer u zelf en ongeknecht,
Het woord getrouw, dat ge onbevreesd moogt spreken:
Voor Vorst, voor Vrijheid en voor Recht.
Voor Vorst, voor Vrijheid en voor Recht.
Voor Vorst, voor Vrijheid en voor Recht.

English Translation (from http://gopher.ulb.ac.be/~best/Publications/anthem.pdf)

O beloved Belgium, sacred land of our fathers,
Our heart and soul are dedicated to you.
Our strength and the blood of our veins we offer,
Be our goal, in work and battle.
Prosper, o country, in unbreakable unity,
Always be yourself and free.
Trust in the word that, undaunted, you can speak:
For King, for Freedom and for Law.
For King, for Freedom and for Law.
For King, for Freedom and for Law.

The Belgian national anthem, La Brabançonne was written in 1830 by Louis-Alexandre Dechet, an actor by profession. Dechet, more commonly known as Jenneval, died later that year in the 1830 Independence War. The current anthem is slightly different from Jenneval's version, since it was reorganised in 1860 by Prime Minister Charles Rogier. The music was composed by François van Campenhout.

"Brabançonne" means "from the Brabant" (an adjectival form) referring to the Wallonian province of Brabant-Wallond. Thus, Brabançonne is also used to describe many other things, including a variety of hen.