display | more...

Stab (?), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Stabbed (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Stabbing.] [Cf. OD. staven to fix, fasten, fr. stave, staff, a staff, rod; akin to G. stab a staff, stick, E. staff; also Gael. stob to stab, as n., a stake, a stub. Cf. Staff.]

1.

To pierce with a pointed weapon; to wound or kill by the thrust of a pointed instrument; as, to stab a man with a dagger; also, to thrust; as, to stab a dagger into a person.

2.

Fig.: To injure secretly or by malicious falsehood or slander; as, to stab a person's reputation.

 

© Webster 1913.


Stab, v. i.

1.

To give a wound with a pointed weapon; to pierce; to thrust with a pointed weapon.

None shall dare With shortened sword to stab in closer war. Dryden.

2.

To wound or pain, as if with a pointed weapon.

She speaks poniards, and every word stabs. Shak.

To stab at, to offer or threaten to stab; to thrust a pointed weapon at.

 

© Webster 1913.


Stab, n.

1.

The thrust of a pointed weapon.

2.

A wound with a sharp-pointed weapon; as, to fall by the stab an assassin.

Shak.

3.

Fig.: An injury inflicted covertly or suddenly; as, a stab given to character.

 

© Webster 1913.