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I see time as the chain links of a DNA strand. Every moment coexists in space, three-dimensional and unchanging, ever-relevant, connected at their most vital points. There are no breaks in the chain, no places where the links before do not intimately affect those after. These links spin from the space of the human mind; they pirouette through every conscious, slightly different, born of half-truths, half-lies, and various personal biases and preferences. History is the most important product of the human mind, and it is the creator of all that follows it.

Imagine: one million years in the future, archaeologists are removing the last layers of ancient dust from a specimen buried in ash. They lift out a book, a collection of jumbled symbols and pictures faded beyond all color, and they send it to their experts in ancient languages, and they learn everything about our time from this simple book. History books are written and school children are inspired by the stories from it; they grow up to be archaeologists themselves, and they find another book buried in the ash, again from our time, and it radically changes everything that their present has ever known about history.

Everything recorded is potentially the future of our history, and imagine what can be learned from it. Prehistory, before poets and scribes and clerics began their chronicles of history, is a time darkened for us by our ignorance; we can only stab in the dark with our toothbrushes bent into the crevices, scraping away the eons hiding fossils. If only there was a book, a home movie, a poem or a prayer, we could imagine that we know so much more.

Moments fall like snowflakes into the bottom of the hourglass, and to catch one and hold it, with words, is my fondest dream. To be a chronicler of our time, and of the times of the past, is to change the future of humanity; I want to be fluent in the language of time so that I can be a creator of worlds that my eye will never see. What I hope for--and it may seem like a lot--is to influence the paths that our progeny will forge through my interpretation of the moments of my past and present.

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