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Regarding the current effects of the Great Tumblr Porn Ban of 2018 -- 

To start with, the LGBT tag still exists in the search bar, so at the very least, that didn't get zorched for good. Nor did the Gay, Lesbian, or Trans tags. The Chronic Pain tag still exists; who knows why it was affected, or any of these were affected, in the first place. It's like every time Tumblr announces a change or an update, the queer tags are the first to go -- but really, chronic pain too?

Secondly, a perusal of various porn blogs has a fair number of them completely hidden from public view for having "sensitive content", yet still there are blogs where women flash their tits, and blogs where men take out their giant dicks. Perhaps these blogs will be hidden later, and Tumblr's proposed "December 17" date was simply a beginning. As it is, I can go onto various porn sites and see a sea of posts that say "this post was hidden from public view", and yet stumble upon a dude ejaculating into someone's mouth. And then there's another one where all the posts have been hidden except the one with double penetration. Nice job, flagbot, you missed a spot.

As a matter of fact, 80% of the pictures that the flagbot missed have dicks in them. How do you like that?

Meanwhile, Staff's example of what was Ok to post got flagged.

Users have reported that they are still getting notes from pornbot blogs, and that they can see advertisements for porn sites. Users have also reported that they can fool the flagbot by tagging their post as #SFW.

And finally, true to the spirit of Tumblr staff:

There is a way for shadowbanned users to turn off the supposedly locked "explicit content" mode. By right-clicking and going into "inspect element", users can find the code for the page, which contains a few lines that are creating the lock on the Explicit Content toggle. By deleting that code, the toggle becomes unlocked.

Yahoo paid about 1.1 billion dollars too much for Tumblr.

UPDATE:

Apparently Verizon decided that it didn't want the Internet Archive to capture images of a pre-December Tumblr. So they blocked the IPs of the Internet Archive team from reaching the website. The team figured out pretty quickly how to get around the blocks, but it's still disturbing that Verizon would block an archive. That's an insult to my profession. I'd say I don't trust Verizon, but this is the company that already throttled the data for California firefighters during a recent firestorm. There is no reason to trust Verizon with anything, nor to forgive them for anything.

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