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Tufts University has one of the oddest monuments. It's called the Gravity Stone, it's the size and shape of regular modern tombstone, and its inscription is as follows:
    THIS MONUMENT HAS BEEN
        ERECTED BY THE
   GRAVITY RESEARCH FOUNDATION
    ROGER W. BABSON FOUNDER

   IT IS TO REMIND STUDENTS OF
    THE BLESSINGS FORTHCOMING
   WHEN A SEMI-INSULATOR IS
  DISCOVERED IN ORDER TO HARNESS
      GRAVITY AS A FREE POWER 
  AND REDUCE AIRPLANE ACCIDENTS
               1961
Roger Babson, who also founded Babson College, achieved fame for his statistical and financial analysis abilities (he predicted the crash of 1929.) He had lost a sister and grandson by drowning and was very interested in the study and, hopefully, ultimate mastery of gravity. He donated money to Tufts with caveat that it be used towards research in this insulator, and also that this monument be placed.

(Babson has another stone in New Boston, New Hampshire, calling attention to that city's role in "active research for anti-gravity and a partial gravity insulator.")

This is a very odd thing to have on your campus. Supposedly, back in the day a popular prank was to assist the Gravity Stone in 'levitating', leaving it to rest in a tree or anywhere up high. The story goes on to say they finally bolted or cemented it down so now its floating days would appear to be over.

...Man. I love this thing. It's such a retrofuture viewpoint... they're proposing a (probably breaking the laws of physics) technical breakthrough that would change so much in society-- I mean, who knows what forms of travel, on Earth and otherwise, would be possible-- and this stone is looking for a reduction in airplane accidents.

I'm glad it's a part of my life.

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