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Having just read two issues of Global Frequency, I have to say I find the premise very satisfying. A worldwide non-military group which discreetly recruits people with skills or knowledge and "activates" them when their special abilities are needed to solve ugly and complex problems certainly sounds appealing. That it is basically the creation of a very well-funded charismatic individual is prehaps a dramatic neccessity - a true grassroots organization would have severe funding and supply issues, and probably difficulty securing cooperation from the authorities when it was needed.

The art is very well done, definitely up to the modern standard of comic book illustration. Each book is done by a different team of artists so the styles differ from story to story. Issue 3's depiction of a horribly twisted biomechanical being is probably one of the creepiest things I've seen in the genre.

That said... I found the two books I read, "Invasive" (#2)and "Big Wheel" (#3) to be extremely under-written, even for comic books. They both deal with dramatically rich science fiction ideas, the first a memetic virus from space which has taken over peoples' brains, and the second a radically enhanced military cyborg who has succumbed to the stress of his transformation and run amuck. But the stories themselves are barely there - a page or two of setup, the team goes in, encounters the threat, a few tiny dabs of character and insight appear, and then the threat is neutralized by clever means and/or personal sacrifice on the part of a team member. Basically, they just weren't interesting to read. I know the modern comic book has much more to offer than this, and I can't help but wonder if the positive reviews I have read about this series on the internet are just the result of leftover good feelings about Warren Ellis' other book "Transmetropolitan"...