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Lum"ber (?), n. [Prob. fr. Lombard, the Lombards being the money lenders and pawnbrokers of the Middle Ages. A lumber room was, according to Trench, originally a Lombard room, or room where the Lombard pawnbroker stored his pledges. See Lombard.]

1.

A pawnbroker's shop, or room for storing articles put in pawn; hence, a pledge, or pawn.

[Obs.]

They put all the little plate they had in the lumber, which is pawning it, till the ships came. Lady Murray.

2.

Old or refuse household stuff; things cumbrous, or bulky and useless, or of small value.

3.

Timber sawed or split into the form of beams, joists, boards, planks, staves, hoops, etc.; esp., that which is smaller than heavy timber.

[U.S.]

Lumber kiln, a room in which timber or lumber is dried by artificial heat. [U.S.] -- Lumber room, a room in which unused furniture or other lumber is kept. [U.S.] -- Lumber wagon, a heavy rough wagon, without springs, used for general farmwork, etc.

 

© Webster 1913.


Lum"ber, b. t. [imp. & p. p. Lumbered (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Lumbering.]

1.

To heap together in disorder.

" Stuff lumbered together."

Rymer.

2.

To fill or encumber with lumber; as, to lumber up a room.

 

© Webster 1913.


Lum"ber, v. i.

1.

To move heavily, as if burdened.

2. [Cf. dial. Sw. lomra to resound.]

To make a sound as if moving heavily or clumsily; to rumble.

Cowper.

3.

To cut logs in the forest, or prepare timber for market.

[U.S.]

 

© Webster 1913.