display | more...

Boots of Elvenkind are a common magical item in almost any fantasy role-playing game (and computer RPGs as well). These boots may also be called Elven boots, Elvish boots, or Elven sneaking boots.

These boots are designed to let the wearer walk silently in even the most adverse of conditions. Someone wearing Boots of Elven kind could walk over broken glass and bubble wrap without making a sound.

The elves originally designed these boots so they could move quietly through the forest without disturbing anyone (or anything). But human thieves have found a better use for these boots, general sneaking around, burglary, and pickpocketing.

These boots are usually made of soft leather, and will rarely be larger than about a modern US size nine (although some of them will expand or contract to fit any wearer). Some of these boots also have a second ability: they do not leave tracks. This variety is far more rare and valuable than the normal one.

These boots can be rather easily constructed by an Elven mage and cobbler working together. "Elven boots" constructed by other races are usually not nearly as effective (often failing at the worst possible moment).

Boots of Elvenkind were probably inspired (like most of the original aspects of D&D) by J.R.R. Tolkein's Elves. Although not as important in the books (and movies!) as the Cloaks of Elvenkind, the boots are definitely responsible for part of the famed Elvish stealth.

In the new Dungeons & Dragons 3rd Edition game:

Boots of Elvenkind: These soft boots enable the wearer to move quietly in virtually any surroundings, granting a +10 circumstance bonus to Move Silently checks.
Caster Level: 7th; Prerequisites: Craft Wonderous Item, secret page, creator must be an elf; Market Price: 9,500gp; Weight: 1 lbs.

These are often used in conjunction with a Cloak of Elvenkind.

Update 9/16/2003: Ouroboros says re Boots of Elvenkind: Would you take note of the 3.5E changes that set this to a +5 bonus?

Log in or register to write something here or to contact authors.