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A villain published by Marvel Comics. Stiltman first appeared in Daredevil #8 in 1965.

Wilbur Day was a scientist who worked for Kaxton Industries, a technology firm. The owner Carl Kaxton invented a hydraulic ram which had a number of industrial applications and was seen to be of potential value. Day felt that he was not being properly compensated and stole the designs for the hydraulic ram and quit his position at Kaxton.

Day took the hydraulic ram design and incorporated into an armored suit so that the wearer could extend the legs of the suit. Day planned to use the suit to break into the upper floors of buildings and rob them, which he did for a while under the name Stiltman.

Stiltman had a successful string of robberies under his belt until he clashed with Daredevil and was brought to justice. Subsequently, Stiltman fought Daredevil and other heroes including Spider-Man, Black Goliath, and She-Hulk. Often times, Stiltman employed high-tech weapons, like particle beams and such, but he was defeated on most occasions. The reason for his frequent defeats was due to the fact that he is conceptually one of the lamest villains to ever make repeated appearances in comics.

The idea of growing to giant-size as a super-power is not a bad one, though problematic. A number of successful heroes have had this ability over the years including Giant-man, Goliath, Atlas from the Thunderbolts, Colossal Boy from the Legion, and even Apache Chief from the Superfriends. But it is not just the great height that makes for a frightening visage. Without the subsequent increase in mass, the character is just really, really tall and there is not menace attributable to great height, just ask Michael Crichton. Hence, the whole concept of a villain that has really long legs is hardly menacing.

Then there is the name: Stiltman. Not really a name that would strike fear in the hearts of your foes. Why not something like Steeplejack or Alto, the Living Skyscraper? Sure they are campy, but at least your immediate reaction isn't to think of those guys who walk around in parades.

And finally, the power itself is problematic. If you had great inventive ability, why would you choose to create an armored suit that allowed you to rob the upper floors of buildings? Imagine trying to break into the 37th floor of a high rise. Okay, you break the window, but now what? You either have to retract a leg to step inside or you are limited to what you can reach from the window. Not exactly, a huge haul unless you are really into window blinds and curtains. There is also the thorny problem of protection. Admittedly, Stiltman's outfit is armored, but one has to imagine that he has to have additional armor on his crotch and ass since they are the part of him to most likely get shot should a bullet reach him. Not exactly something that you want to tell the other supervillains.

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