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It took me some time, when I was living in the USA, to spot a singular characteristic of the american Weltanschauung, namely, the belief that:

If any given quantity of something is good
then twice as much of that same thing will be twice as good.

(the converse opinion, obtained replacing good with bad and twice with half also holds).
This is equivalent in believing that gains and losses (broadly defined) are linear (in the mathematical meaning of the word), or as the saying goes:

You cannot have too much of a good thing.

Now I am not implying that a majority - or even a sizable minority - of Northern Americans have a literal belief in this obviously extremistic position, just that it appears to be an attractor of the American thought. There are examples of people (often, for obvious reasons, deceased people) who appear to have held this literal view: I remember reading the case of a US person that, on the grounds that excess salt intake is bad, was so successful in avoiding it to come down with a rather severe case of sodium deficiency (to the disbelief of the treating physician).

As a consequence of this, the complementary sayings "All in moderation" and "Leaving good enough alone" always appear to belong to (Northern) America's peripheral vision: Americans are often called enthusiastic and energetic, seldom moderate.

This linear delusion is not necessarily bad, in fact it is partly responsible for several of what I deem to be the best American qualities (just like the - opposite - Italian universal penchant for compromise has both good and bad effects).

Having conscience of this has helped me explain several (otherwise unexplainable) quirks of the American way of life.

For instance, it is customary in Italy to have small office parties for a colleague birthday - held during the work hours and in the office, it lasts anywhere from 10 to 20 minutes and the person holding the party brings some pastry and something to drink, often including some white wine.
An American visitor invited to one of these parties, was quite shocked at seeing this and remarked that any form of alcohol introduction in his office (he was hired at a large aircraft manufacturer in the US) would have been unthinkable and constitute grounds for immediate firing.
Most of the other folks put on their best "wacky americans" faces: why should a little wine once in a while be so bad?

And they were of course missing the point of the prohibition, that (to me) was obviously avoiding the possibility of the perception that if "a little wine once in a while" is OK at the office, then twice as much wine twice as often is equally OK or better, etc. - typical linear thinking...

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