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Senator Robert Edward Kelly was one of the most-hated villains in Marvel Comics' The Uncanny X-Men. His first appearance was in issue #141. The fanatical Kelly regarded mutants as a threat to National Security and All That is Good (tm), so he decided to try and pass legislation on the Mutant Registration Act. Of course, our evil friends, the Brotherhood of Mutants mildly objected and attempted to kick his pansy ass, and he was only saved by X-Men.

Undaunted, Mr. Senator befriended Sebastian Shaw, the man responsible for building Sentinels, giant robotic mutant-hunting machines. Kelly threw his support behind the Sentinel project, and grew even more bitter when his wife Sharon was killed in a fight involving the X-Men.

Well, as all giant robotic mutant-hunting machines do, the Sentinels went crazy, thanks in part to the android Bastion. When Kelly found out that the Sentinels threatened National Security and All That is Good (tm), he withdrew his support from the project. When Bastion found out that Kelly found out, he decided to kill Kelly's pansy ass.

Oh, and remember Sebastian Shaw? Well, Kelly found out he was a mutant too, and a member of the Hellfire Club. Doh!

So now Kelly is in deep, deep trouble... what does he decide to do? That's right, in the most hypocritical display ever, Kelly decides to run for President on an anti-mutant platform and simultaneously asks both S.H.I.E.L.D. and the X-Men for assistance (which he gets in the form of Cable).

Well, it turns out even Cable couldn't save Kelly from the Brotherhood of Mutants - but, amazingly enough, it was former Brotherhood member Pyro, who did, dying selflessly in the act. Kelly finally realized that he had been acting like a jackass and rethought his stance on mutants. But, as is no big surprise, an anti-mutant zealot who thought Kelly had betrayed humanity and violated National Security and All That is Good (tm), assassinated him, with Cable nearby. Cable's not very good as a bodyguard, huh?

Okay, now you can go compare Kelly's life (and especially his death) to that of Mahatma Gandhi.

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