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In chess, "better" refers to a specific situation in which one player has a very slight advantage over the other player, but the final result is still very much in doubt. With perfect play, a player who is better might be able to "convert" their slight advantage into a victory, but in practice players who are better often lose their advantage with even a single inaccuracy because the advantage is so small.

Chess advantages are typically estimated in terms of the approximate number of pawns the advantage is worth. A player who is better typically has an advantage of around one pawn or less. Conversely, a player who is estimated to be at a disadvantage of around one pawn or less is said to be "worse."

However, a player with an advantage of around two pawns or more is said to be "winning" - they have a significant advantage and would not be likely to lose unless they make several mistakes or a serious blunder.

Because "better" refers to a very specific situation in which one player has a very small, almost meaningless advantage, saying one player is "better" is very often followed by "but..." For example, "Now that they have won a pawn, white is better here, but it is going to be extremely hard to convert this advantage into a victory."

Bet"ter (?), a.; compar. of Good. [OE. betere, bettre, and as adv. bet, AS. betera, adj., and bet, adv.; akin to Icel. betri, adj., betr, adv., Goth. batiza, adj., OHG. bezziro, adj., baz, adv., G. besser, adj. and adv., bass, adv., E. boot, and prob. to Skr. bhadra excellent. See Boot advantage, and cf. Best, Batful.]

1.

Having good qualities in a greater degree than another; as, a better man; a better physician; a better house; a better air.

Could make the worse appear The better reason. Milton.

2.

Preferable in regard to rank, value, use, fitness, acceptableness, safety, or in any other respect.

To obey is better than sacrifice. 1 Sam. xv. 22.

It is better to trust in the Lord than to put confidence in princes. Ps. cxviii. 9.

3.

Greater in amount; larger; more.

4.

Improved in health; less affected with disease; as, the patient is better.

5.

More advanced; more perfect; as, upon better acquaintance; a better knowledge of the subject.

All the better. See under All, adv. -- Better half, an expression used to designate one's wife.

My dear, my better half (said he), I find I must now leave thee. Sir P. Sidney.

-- To be better off, to be in a better condition. -- Had better. (See under Had). The phrase had better, followed by an infinitive without to, is idiomatic. The earliest form of construction was "were better" with a dative; as, "Him were better go beside." (Gower.) i. e., It would be better for him, etc. At length the nominative (I, he, they, etc.) supplanted the dative and had took the place of were. Thus we have the construction now used.

By all that's holy, he had better starve Than but once think this place becomes thee not. Shak.

 

© Webster 1913.


Bet"ter, n.

1.

Advantage, superiority, or victory; -- usually with of; as, to get the better of an enemy.

2.

One who has a claim to precedence; a superior, as in merit, social standing, etc.; -- usually in the plural.

Their betters would hardly be found. Hooker.

For the better, in the way of improvement; so as to produce improvement. "If I have altered him anywhere for the better."

Dryden.

 

© Webster 1913.


Bet"ter, adv.; compar. of Well.

1.

In a superior or more excellent manner; with more skill and wisdom, courage, virtue, advantage, or success; as, Henry writes better than John; veterans fight better than recruits.

I could have better spared a better man. Shak.

2.

More correctly or thoroughly.

The better to understand the extent of our knowledge. Locke.

3.

In a higher or greater degree; more; as, to love one better than another.

Never was monarch better feared, and loved. Shak.

4.

More, in reference to value, distance, time, etc.; as, ten miles and better.

[Colloq.]

To think better of (any one), to have a more favorable opinion of any one. -- To think better of (an opinion, resolution, etc.), to reconsider and alter one's decision.

 

© Webster 1913.


Bet"ter (?), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Bettered (#); p. pr. & vb. n. Bettering.] [AS. beterian, betrian, fr. betera better. See Better, a.]

1.

To improve or ameliorate; to increase the good qualities of.

Love betters what is best. Wordsworth.

He thought to better his circumstances. Thackeray.

2.

To improve the condition of, morally, physically, financially, socially, or otherwise.

The constant effort of every man to better himself. Macaulay.

3.

To surpass in excellence; to exceed; to excel.

The works of nature do always aim at that which can not be bettered. Hooker.

4.

To give advantage to; to support; to advance the interest of.

[Obs.]

Weapons more violent, when next we meet, May serve to better us and worse our foes. Milton.

Syn. -- To improve; meliorate; ameliorate; mend; amend; correct; emend; reform; advance; promote.

 

© Webster 1913.


Bet"ter, v. i.

To become better; to improve.

Carlyle.

 

© Webster 1913.


Bet"ter, n.

One who bets or lays a wager.

 

© Webster 1913.

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